Thoughts on Close Encounters

They have for some reason rereleased the Steven Spielberg classic Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind theatrically. It is competing against such other classics as Nut Job 2. Rather than doing a traditional review, I am going to bring up some questions which came to mind while watching this on the big screen 40 years after the original release.

  1. The first thing which is striking about this film by today’s standards is the extent to which Spielberg trashes the middle class traditional family. The husband is being accosted by his spoiled brat kids, who will not compromise with him regarding family outings and such. The kids and wife are always bugging and nagging him about little things and don’t allow Dreyfuss to realize his full potential as a human being.
  2. The husband leaves the wife (Terri Garr) for Melina Dillon, whose child he saves. He does this to feel like a man and to be a hero. Does Spielberg feel that men should leave their wives in pursuit of adventure and for a higher purpose? The way Dreyfuss leaves with the aliens is not unlike how Jesus’s Apostles were called upon and left everything behind, including their wives and children.
  3. Which brings us to the next point, why was Dreyfuss chosen by the aliens as the sole human to be allowed entry to the spacecraft? The aliens swarm around him in with his arms extended wide (in a messianic fashion). Is Spielberg saying that Dreyfuss becomes the messiah as the aliens decided to share advanced technology or thought with him. Am thinking this has to do something with the telekinesis he has in terms of having been sent the idea to meet the aliens at Devil’s Canyon. Perhaps telekinesis would allow the aliens to speed up the communication with humans to a great extent.
  4. An interesting side-note is that the only other character the aliens choose to interact with in the film is the French scientist played by Trauffaut, a great French director. He does the hand signs that correlate to the notes. Why did the aliens choose him to speak to? Because of his intellectual curiosity??
  5. At the press conference the older cowboy dude discredits the UFO siting by bringing up his Bigfoot experience. Was this guy a nut, genuine, or a government spook who was planted at the news conference in order to discredit the eyewitnesses? Does Spielberg believe in Bigfoot? Poltergeist, A.I., and Close Encounters were the only screenplays he actually wrote by the way. So he was into far out stuff.
  6. The cow mutilations in the film. What’s up with that? The one dude with the glasses does get gassed by the black helicopter. However, the other people take their masks off when they are by the military. Were the cows gassed or precision slayed like in real life? Was the government testing the cows for radiation?
  7. Also , the aliens in the film do have the tall skinny ones, and then the short stubby ones , like in Whitley Strieber’s Communion. Does Spielberg believe this is what aliens really look like and that aliens exist?
  8. Spielberg has been quoted as saying that NASA originally sent him a 20 page letter telling him to not make the film. That making this film would be too dangerous for the general public. What’s up with that???

Wikileaks: E.T. Attack Election Hoax


This document shows that the government is polling the impact of itself orchestrating various attacks and hoaxes – in order to ensure that elitist scum are elected.

The left is panicked about the election, and they are scheming to win BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY. They know that people see through the BS poll results, because they can see giant crowds at Trump rallies with their own eyes. Americans also realize that the women claiming Trump groped them have too many holes in their stories, plus eyewitnesses who rebut them. And they said nice things about Trump for years and years in many cases, prior to throwing him under the bus.

A new document out from a polling and political advising company in Washington D.C. says that the US government has worked on far-fetched nefarious scenarios to tilt the election its way.

They poll tested everything from race riots to radiation from nukes, and found that only an attack from aliens from outer space would keep Trump supporters from voting. Some Trump Deplorables actual were polled as being even more likely to vote if there were race riots or a natural disaster. This scenario of the E.T. invasion hoax sounds basically far-fetched and impossible. However, it is actually entirely doable, with laser technology the DOD/CIA has which is meant to project large scale holograms of spacecraft – in order to intimidate voters. That secret project is called Project Firesign.

While this most recent leaked document concluded that E.T. attack would be the most effective way for Clinton to win – please note that there are also other plots labeled under “BLM”, “Sharia etc”, and “radiation” for example, And though those polled as less likely to keep Trumpsteers from voting – some of them would be easier to pull off for them. I am also highly suspicious that Twitter has been having issues today – since that is Trump’s communication platform.

Also, if you know anything about aliens – you know they are really our friends. They tried to make themselves known to the world in the 1950s and prior by flying over DC and Moscow ( it was at the top of national credible newspapers at the time). Read the last few chapters of Whitley Strieber’s Breakthrough for a historical overview of UFO appearances in the United States.


Summer Reading List



It has been a fun summer. But I think I took the wrong books on that picnic date. Lets review some of this past summer’s reading:

Breakthrough by Whitley Strieber. (1995) Highly Recommended.

Mr. Strieber’s follow-up to Communion is once again about getting abducted by aliens. Its awesome because he writes it as non-fiction in the first person and makes it extremely vivid. I’m not saying there really are aliens abducting him -the remote New York cabin location seems kind of convenient to avoid witnesses or security seeing the aliens. Yet his paranoia makes a darn good horror story. The last few chapters are an awesome retrospective on the history of the US government, the media, and UFO’s. Another great thing about this book is it left open who the aliens are. Strieber claims they could be time-travelers (inter-dimensional beings) , or that aliens could surrogates of foreign governments, the US government, or private corporations.

Love + Sex with Robots by David Levy (2007) Not Recommended.

I was pretty excited when I started this book, and by the time I had read forty pages I felt like someone should have been paying me to read it. With subject matter like this, the author needs to make it kind of funny and enjoyable to read. This book is very dry and scholastic in its tone. The author does an excellent job of providing information to the reader. He even goes back into the history of sex dolls. All the way to modern Japan, where the top corporations have done these advanced robotics and AI. There’s explanations of why people will want sexbots. Including psychological studies and so forth. And taking into account things such as convenience, locality, attachment etc. However, since it is written in a style which is as though he was turning it in for a college thesis to be graded – it is not as enjoyable to the average reader who is seeking information in a way that is fun. Therefor, I would not recommend this book to a friend. Though, at the same time, I do give props to the author for his vast knowledge of sexbots and for taking on a topic which sometimes results in ridicule.

Nihilism by Brett Stevens (2016) Highly Recommended.

Are you ready to challenge your basic assumptions about humanity? If you answered yes, then I would highly recommend you add this book to the end of summer reading list. Its author keeps the readers turning the pages by strongly challenging basic assumptions about whether modern civilization is on the right track or not. Stevens argues that society is in denial about how bad things are, like in Voltaire’s Candide.  His condemnation of society as well as his remedies both challenge the reader to brainstorm with him about how it could be possible to get civilization back on track. He avoids fatalism by not saying everything is doomed. But rather suggests his own solutions, which is refreshing (whether or not you necessarily agree with all of them). The author believes that much less government imposed order would be beneficial to humanity. This is interesting because it evokes some libertarian principles. There is Rousseau/Hobbesian inspired state of nature aspects to this book. At the same time it is ironic. Since it crosses with a form of Jacksonian social Darwinism, which is looked down upon by scholars traditionally (yet has always had populist appeal). A highly provocative book, for deep thinkers. – Steve C.