Dominique Strauss-Kahn and leadership

We all know the story:

After centuries of living in a terrible horrible no-good place where the little people did not matter, the people banded together — and accepted everyone, especially misfits and goofballs — and overthrew the bad elites.

Now the little people are listened to.

For this reason, when a big international banker (the people who caused the recent financial collapse, not the 20 million idiots who signed ARM loans) is accused of rape by one of the little people, we take it very seriously.

We throw his ass in jail and then start looking for the facts.

Over time, those pesky facts pop up like blackheads:

According to the two officials, the woman had a phone conversation with an incarcerated man within a day of her encounter with Mr. Strauss-Kahn in which she discussed the possible benefits of pursuing the charges against him. The conversation was recorded.

That man, the investigators learned, had been arrested on charges of possessing 400 pounds of marijuana. He is among a number of individuals who made multiple cash deposits, totaling around $100,000, into the woman’s bank account over the last two years. The deposits were made in Arizona, Georgia, New York and Pennsylvania.

The investigators also learned that she was paying hundreds of dollars every month in phone charges to five companies. The woman had insisted she had only one phone and said she knew nothing about the deposits except that they were made by a man she described as her fiancé and his friends.

In addition, one of the officials said, she told investigators that her application for asylum included mention of a previous rape, but there was no such account in the application. She also told them that she had been subjected to genital mutilation, but her account to the investigators differed from what was contained in the asylum application. – NYT

Holy fucking shit, I’m having a flashback… wait… here it is…

The sexual assault nurse’s report of blunt force trauma was undermined by other accounts of her activities as a stripper the weekend before the lacrosse party. There was no other forensic evidence to support her account. And other than the accuser, no one claimed to have witnessed the assault —including a second dancer hired for the evening and the 20 or so men at the party.

Mr. Cooper succinctly summed up the evidence this way: “No D.N.A. confirms the accuser’s story. No other witness confirms her story. Other evidence contradicts her story. She contradicts herself.”

One of those contradictions forced Mr. Nifong to drop the rape charges in December. The woman, who had repeatedly said she endured violent penile penetration, suddenly said she could no longer be sure what had penetrated her. This came after it had been revealed that sophisticated DNA tests found no traces from any of the three defendants — or any other Duke lacrosse player — on her body or clothes. DNA from other men, however, was found. – NYT

For a moment, I thought I stepped into the same movie.

Morgan Freeman was the victim’s father, Maya Rudolph the accuser, and Seth Rogen, Shia LeBouef and Jake Gyllenhaal as the accused. Kenneth Branagh would be deputy DA Mike Nifong, and Crispin Glover would give a sinister performance as the defendant’s lawyer.

If you swapped out Brian Cox for Rogen, LeBouef and Gyllenhaal, you’d have the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case.

Rich, white, powerful people abuse little people and think they’ll get away with it because they’re rich and powerful. Then thanks to the goodness of people, the little people turn the tables on them.

Except in both cases, it wasn’t this way.

However, I’m glad Dominique Strauss-Kahn will not be resuming his political career. I’m also of limited sympathy for whoever planned the Duke lacrosse party with a stripper.

Here’s why:

Although forensic tests found unambiguous evidence of a sexual encounter between Mr. Strauss-Kahn, a French politician, and the woman, prosecutors now do not believe much of what the accuser has told them about the circumstances or about herself. – from the first NYT article

If you are a wealthy and powerful person, you are one thing to all people below you in the socioeconomic scale — a target.

Unlike in Hollywood movies, where the goodness of all people equally is featured again and again (and again and again), in life many people are opportunistic. They also know they have almost no chance of being turned down in our current climate, where movies about the big and powerful abusing the small are very, very, very popular.

You don’t, as a world-leader politician, or as a child of privilege, ever involve yourself in any dubious business with the lower social classes. They’re going to take you to the cleaners.

You, as a rich white kid, do not hire a poor black prostitute as your stripper. First, strippers are notorious criminals; they’ll do anything for coke. Second, prostitutes are criminals. Finally, there’s no way you’ll escape the narrative of money, class, power, and racial resentment.

With its overtones of race, sex and privilege, the Duke case instantly drew national news media attention. The accuser was a poor, black, local single mother working at an escort service while enrolled at the predominantly black North Carolina Central University in Durham; the Duke students were relatively well-off, white out-of-staters — members of a storied lacrosse team at one of the nation’s most prestigious universities. The accuser’s vivid account of racist and misogynistic taunts also fueled a simmering debate about the off-field behavior of elite athletes and the proper role of big-time sports on America’s college campuses. – from the second NYT article

Being able to cry racism or rape is how the little people take revenge.

Our society is stupid enough to take them at their word, mainly because rich white men in judge’s robes wanted to protect these little people.

What they didn’t take into account is that people who are poor drug-addicted prostitutes are the cause of their own problems. Their behavior shows an inability to take charge of any aspect of their lives.

You should expect them to see you, a rich white idiot, as a gold mine.

Dominique Strauss-Kahn had some kind of sexual contact with this nutcase of a woman, which shows he is without a clue as to the workings of the real world. Women cry rape when they think they’ll get away with it, and when there’s something to win, like a nice rich guy’s payout.

She was undoubtedly oblivious to the fact that she ended his political career; she didn’t care.

In the end though, what did him in was an inability to handle his power. To be above others, and both not abuse that position and not take their lies at face value, is the mark of a leader.

One Response to “Dominique Strauss-Kahn and leadership”

  1. Lightning says:

    Pretty good article. I don’t sympathize with Strauss-Kahn at all. He’s a parasite with no self-control who fucks everything he can get his hands on. This guy is not a ‘leader’. He has power, but no idea what to do with it. Why don’t we chain him to the prostitute he fucked and throw them both in the ocean as a gesture of good-will towards everything that isn’t an ugly disgrace?

    The point here is that in our current society, slaves (underclass) and masters (upperclass) both suck. Both are composed of the same basic element. They’re all Sudras. We can’t afford to fall in to the illogical assumption that existing elites are acceptable, good, or well-intentioned just because those they rule/employ are degenerate trash with eternal entitlement complexes. I was raised in a fairly wealthy family, and my contact with people in the higher echelons of the business/finance world has left me certain that the primary qualitative distinction between the classes at this point in time is that wealthy people can tie their shoes and generally conceal their deficiencies behind the gloss of their wealth.

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